The lift-to-be-lean program

You've heard it before – there are no short cuts when it comes to fitness. But what if this were only halfway true? What if there was a faster, arguably better way to change your body and get some rest, with fewer sets and reps and less time in the gym, a shortcut that you can use right away, with no regrets or guilt? Read on to find out more about this magical training unicorn.

Learn how to lean out by maximizing.

Thank you for watching!Visit the website

Rep rap

While many people assume that lifting lighter weights for 15 to 25 or more reps somehow leads to leaner muscle, that's not how the body works. "Super-long sets are great for muscle endurance," said Heather Farmer, a national Olympic weightlifting competitor and fitness trainer in New York City. "But using heavy weights builds your muscle tissue and gives you the shape and the lean, strong look you are looking for. That means you only do two to three reps and 80 to 90 percent of your maximum reps on the last Need to lift sets of your main exercises. "

Lower reps naturally allow you to handle heavier loads – and that's exactly what the gains the typical oxygen reader desires. "Unless challenged and lifting the maximum possible load, your upper limit on overall strength is much lower," Farmer says, adding that heavy lifting doesn't make you look like these gay guys in powerlifting competitions. "These guys get their fat, powerful bodies from diet: they eat a ton of calories and store them as body fat. If you want a lean physique, you want to gain some muscle. The most efficient way to do this is by getting the muscle to move a little beyond his strength limits on a constant basis. "

Thank you for watching!Visit the websiteThank you for watching!Visit the website

Lift up to be slim

This plan, devised by Farmer, revolves around the main strength exercises that promote muscle building: the front squat, the strict overhead press, the deadlift, the push-grip press and the overhead squat. Combined with a variety of side movements, this plan improves strength and performance, and gives you that lean, strong look you are looking for.

Every workout begins with some unique warm-up exercises to get your blood pumping and keep your mind occupied. Then get on your big lift for the day – the one that will help you build the coveted muscle tissue and increase strength. "They want to push themselves and keep in great shape," says Farmer. "From week to week, try to add to the total weight you can handle so that your max one rep increases."

Since heavy lifting is a new incentive for those who have used a higher rep scheme, you need more rest to recover between sets – up to three minutes, according to Farmer. This allows your muscles and central nervous system to regroup before hitting it again with the next set.

Each workout ends with a cycle of four exercises, which should be done quickly and with minimal pause. "The idea is to get the highest weight possible without losing shape for conditioning," says Farmer. "These circuits require the coordination of major muscle groups and give proper attention to some isolated, smaller muscle groups that are used for stabilization and general joint health."

For programming, Farmer recommends including this schedule in a periodic schedule. "For example, you could do three months of a lower-rep strength program (like this one), one to three months of a medium-weight / medium-rep program, and then one to two months of higher endurance repetitions." She says. "This will keep your body off-balance so it never has a chance to get into a rut."

Maxing Out

You don't know your maximum for one repetition? Don't worry: the “% 1RM” column in this plan is intended as a guide. "The weight you choose can also be determined by the perceived effort and doesn't have to be an exact measure," says Farmer. "Some exercises may not have a clear maximum number of repetitions, and it is not necessary to determine such a number in order to benefit from the exercise."

The lift-to-be-lean program

Do these four workouts over the course of a week, leaving at least a day or two of rest in between. For each exercise, choose a weight that is challenging enough that you will almost temporarily experience muscle failure on the last rep listed.

Barbell crouched forward

Barbell crouched forward

Day 1: Barbell Front Squat

Hold a barbell over your upper chest and collarbone in the front rack position: elbows raised high below, fingertips on the bar outside your shoulders. Keep your chest high, back flat, and eyes forward as you stand in a shoulder-width position with your legs protruding slightly from your hips. Start the movement above your hips as you bend your knees to lower yourself like you are in a chair. Lower yourself until your thighs are parallel or just below the floor. Go through your heels and move your hips forward to return to standing.

Tip: "Keep your elbows in mind as you come out of the lower front crouch," says Farmer. "If you lift your hips first, you are likely leaning forward and risking a missed lift or even a back strain."

Barbell front squat workout

exercise Sets Representative

Warning up movements

Inchworm

Side squat

Kettlebell Swing

-superset with- Burpee

– –

2

2

2

2

– –

6th

6 (each side)

fifteen

fifteen

Main exercise

Barbell crouched forward

Sets

1

1

2

2

1

% 1RM

50

60

75

85

90

Circuit

Side cup squat

Two-armed, curved row

Dumbbell lunge

Jump squat

– –

3

3

3

3

– –

8 (each side)

12

8 (each side)

12

Barbell Strict Press

Barbell Strict Press

Day 2: Barbell Strict Press

Hold the barbell over your shoulders and collarbone in the front rack position, but with your elbows slightly lower so you can wrap your hands completely around the bar outside your shoulders. Take a shoulder-width position while your pelvis is neutral and firm. Keep your chest high as you push the bar straight up. Use only the strength of your muscles, not the momentum. Gently lower the bar back down and allow it to come to a complete stop before starting the next rep.

Tip: "Squeeze your glutes and brace your core to keep your hips and spine stable during the rep," says Farmer. "Avoid overlapping or loosening your core."

Barbell Strict Press Workout

exercise Sets Representative

Warm up exercises

Seat cable row

One-armed kettlebell press

Reverse Pec Deck Flye

– –

2

2

2

– –

fifteen

15 (each arm)

fifteen

Main exercise

Barbell Strict Press

Sets / repetitions

2/6

2/4

1/3

3/2

% 1RM

60

70

80

85-90

Circuit

Dumbbell curl and press

Press dumbbell

Dumbbell Renegade series with push-up

Dumbbell triceps extension

– –

4th

4th

4th

4th

– –

12, 12, 8, 8

12, 12, 8, 8

12, 12, 8, 8

12, 12, 8, 8 (each arm)

Barbell deadlift

Barbell deadlift

Day 3: barbell deadlift

Stand with your toes shoulder-width apart under a loaded barbell, so close that your shins touch. Push your hips back and bend your knees to lower yourself just enough that you can grip the bar shoulder width apart, alternately, or overhand. Your back should be flat, aligned from your neck to your tailbone, and with your weight in your heels. Keep your arms straight as you pull the bar straight up along your shins and thighs, straightening your knees and hips at the same rate until you are standing. Squeeze your glutes together and slightly push your hips forward at the top. Then reverse the movement back to the ground.

Tip: "Lock your back and remember to push your body off the floor by driving your feet flat into the floor instead of lifting the bar up and away," says Farmer.

Barbell deadlift workout

exercise Sets Repetitions / time

Warm up exercises

Couch stretch

Alternating kettlebell bench press in the Glutei Bridge

Cup of squat

– –

2

3

3

– –

30-60 seconds (each leg)

10 (each arm)

fifteen

Main exercise

Barbell deadlift

Sets / repetitions

1/5

1/5

2/3

3/2

% 1RM

50

65

75

85

Circuit

Dumbbell thruster

Bulgarian split squat

Pawn carry

Dumbbell romanian deadlift

– –

4th

4th

4th

4th

– –

10

10 (each side)

40 (total steps)

10

Snatch-Grip Push Press

Snatch-Grip Push Press

Day 4: Snatch-Grip Push Press

Position a barbell over your upper back and trap, holding the bar in a gripping grip. (See “Finding Your Grab Bar” below.) Bend your knees slightly to give yourself weight. Keep your feet in contact with the floor while your hips move backwards. Then, raise vigorously and create momentum with your legs as you extend your arms, push the bar over your head and finish the lift with your elbows locked and your legs straight. Gently lower the bar back behind your neck, absorbing shocks with your knees. Reset, then repeat.

Tip: Go through your heels – not your toes – to push the weight up. If you step on your toes, you can move your body – and the barbell – forward and become unbalanced.

Overhead squat

Overhead squat

Overhead squat

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your legs slightly away from your hips and either take the bar off the floor or grab it with your hands from a rack (see previous page) and press it directly over your head . Actively push the bar as if you were pushing the ceiling as you step back your hips and bend your knees. Squat slowly to keep your balance. Go as deep as possible, ideally to a point where your thighs are parallel to or below the floor while maintaining your natural lower back arch. Drive vigorously from the bottom to the top to the full extent.

Tip: “If you're having trouble going low, stop for three to five seconds where the elevator feels unstable,” Farmer suggests. "Often when people hit their depth limit, they shoot straight up, but the body never has time to adjust to the lowest positions that way."

Snatch-Grip Push Press + Overhead Squat Workout

exercise Sets Representative

Warm up exercises

Kettlebell Swing

Side cup squat

– –

2

2

– –

10

10 (each leg)

Main exercises

Snatch-Grip Push Press

– –

– –

Overhead squat

– –

– –

Sets / repetitions

2/5

3/3

2/2

2/5

3/2

2/2

% 1RM

60-65

70-75

80-90

60-65

70-75

80-90

Circuit

One-armed landmine press

Pull-up (or lat pulldown)

Burpee

Row of one-armed landmines

– –

3

3

3

3

– –

15 (each arm)

10

10

10 (each arm)

Rack It

If you are planning on doing heavy lifting – even if you have a spotter – and you decide you only want one rep at most, it is a good idea to use a rack. This allows you to load a bar heavier than you could lift if you had to pull the bar off the floor into position. Racks have movable pins to hold the barbell in place, and some also have safety bars that can be positioned to stop the barbell and prevent injury.

As you approach the bar in a rack, center yourself, then bend your knees and hips to get under the bar. Position your hands accordingly and keep your back straight. Then just stand up and lift the bar off the pins to put the load on you. Take a small step back from the rack to avoid hitting the rack during the exercise, position your feet correctly, and then start your reps. When replacing the bar, step forward between the rack posts and ensure that both ends of the bar are positioned over the pins before putting it down and pulling it out.

Where to put the pens

Front squat: At or just below chest height

Strict press: Just below shoulder height

Snatch-grip printing press: At or just below shoulder height

Overhead squat: Just below shoulder height

We purchase all products that we offer on oxygenmag.com independently of each other. If you shop using the links on our website, we may receive a partner commission, which in turn supports our work.

Comments are closed.